Friday, December 29, 2006

People in Glass Houses

Former Secretary of Education William Bennett rights of Gerald Ford "If he felt so strongly about his words having a derogatory affect, how about telling Woodward not to run the interview until after Bush & Cheney are out of office?" Former Secretary Bennett is an expert on the old frowny face, but I think he meant "derogatory effect," and I used to think he was literate to.

He concludes "This is not courage, this is not decent." Well he has shown courage and decency by attacking a recently deceased man for daring to criticize the President in public (his three courageous decent alternatives do not include criticizing Bush in public unless Bush agrees to a public debate and pigs fly but do include keeping the whole disagreement secret forever). However, Former Secretary Dr Bennett is having a bit of trouble with grammer. "This is not courage, this is not decency" is English,
"This is not courageous this is not decent" is English, "This is not courage, this is not decent," is not courageous, decent or English.

And yes, the title reflects my amusement at finding myself correcting someone else's English usage.

Stephen Kinsella has left a new comment on your post "12/29/2006 12:07:00 AM":

De Nada on the link, actually I'm quite the fan of your blog. Have a happy New Year!

Steve

Thanks Steve here is the link

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post "12/29/2006 12:07:00 AM":

My dear Pot, let me introduce you to Kettle.

you wrote: "Former Secretary of Education William Bennett rights ... " as well as "I used to think he was literate to."

Yet you have the nerve to blame him for writing affect rather than effect?

No doubt you will respond that your mistakes were typos, but his was something else. I think not (and so saying, disappear)!

update: Who is irony deprived ?

In fact I respond by pointing out that my use of "right" for "write" and "to" for "too" were too deliberate errors. It was a feeble attempt at humor (or Humor as the case may be). Thus the final sentence of my post.

Indeed I could have entitled it "the pot calling the kettle black" and have concluded "by the way I, of course, am the pot in question." Sad to say, however, I find "the pot calling the kettle black" to be politically incorrect and use "the snow calling the sand white" instead.

This, I fear would have caused still more confusion.

I keep re-reading anonymous's comment (or is it anonymous' comment ?) assuming I am missing the joke

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